Articles about “Legal Information”

About mandatory reporting

For Students, Teachers, Workers

This booklet explains what mandatory reporting is and who is mandated, how to report and who should to notify and what happens next.

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Abuse and harm - legal and practice definitions

For Workers

This Advice provides information for Child Protection practitioners on the legal and practice definitions associated with 'children in need of protection' due to harm from abuse or neglect, and includes a definition of 'significant harm'.

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All about court network

For Female Survivors, Male Survivors

The Court Network gives help to all people in contact with the courts.

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Allegations of child sexual abuse

For Family & Friends, Female Survivors, Male Survivors, Students, Workers

In this article, challenges to the reliability of children's testimony are discussed. Increasing concern over possible false allegations of sexual abuse by children has led to a spate of laboratory studies that demonstrate the conditions under which children report false information.

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Applying for victims of crime assistance

For Female Survivors, Male Survivors, Workers

The Victims of Crime Assistance Tribunal ("VOCAT") aims to financially reimburse sexual assault victims from expenses that they have incurred or will likely incur as a result of the sexual assault. This booklet explains how to apply.

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Can my client records be subpoenaed

For Female Survivors, Male Survivors, Workers

In Victoria, this falls under the Evidence (Confidential Communications) Act 1998.

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Child physical abuse: Understanding and responding

For Students, Teachers, Workers

This booklet has been developed for professionals whose work brings them into contact with children and who are required by law to report child physical abuse. It contains information concerning: Definitions; Indicators; Effects; Legislation; How to report child physical abuse; and how to help and protect children who have been...

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Child sexual abuse: Understanding and responding

For Students, Teachers, Workers

Professionals working with children are likely to come in contact with children who have experienced sexual abuse. They need to be prepared to recognise and respond to child sexual abuse, and to support child victims and their families. This booklet will help professionals respond to this serious social problem.

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Children in the legal system

For Family & Friends, Workers

The legal system plays a vital role in the protection of children. The law provides a framework in which child protection work can, take place, and allows for coercive intervention wherever this is necessary to protect a child, whether through care and protection proceedings or through the prosecution of suspected offenders.

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Confronting precedent and prejudice

For Workers

This paper examines the way the legal system is adjusting to current acknowledgement of child sexual abuse. This difficulty arises out of the theoretical orientation of the legal system itself, and out of the practical operation of the system.

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Court illustrations

Illustrations of the different Victorian courts.

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Family violence

For Female Survivors, Male Survivors

In Victoria, family violence covers a range of behaviours committed by a person against a family member. All the behaviours aim to control a family member through fear, and include the following:

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Going to court

For Family & Friends, Female Survivors, Male Survivors, Workers, Young People

In Victoria, all criminal cases against adults begin in the Magistrates’ Court. Most criminal cases against people aged over 10 and under 18 at the time of the offence are dealt with by the Children’s Court.  The following pages contain information for victim/survivors about these courts.

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How the legal system responds to sexual assault victim/survivors

For Female Survivors, Workers

Sexual assault is one of the most under reported crimes in Australia. There are many reasons for this, including the social stigma which flows from myths surrounding sexual assault, and the ways in which the assumptions beyond those myths flow into the workings of the legal system.

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Information for apprentices about sexual harassment

For Family & Friends, Female Survivors, Male Survivors, Teachers, Workers, Young People

Information for apprentices about sexual harassment in the workplace. Sexual harassment is not just about the behaviour of another person, it is also about how it affects you. It can alter your concentration and attitude towards work, which in turn can affect your work performance and chance of promotion.

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Information for victims of rape

For Female Survivors, Male Survivors, Workers, Young People

This article is designed to give those of you who have been or currently are the victims of sexual assault (together with the friends, family and perhaps school counsellors who are supporting you) information which should be of use to you.

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Legal definitions of sexual offences

For Family & Friends, Female Survivors, Male Survivors, Teachers, Workers, Young People

This booklet defines consent, rape, intent, indecent offences against children, incest and offences against young people.

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Legal ombudsman

For Family & Friends, Female Survivors, Male Survivors

The Legal Ombudsman has the power to investigate complaints about the professional conduct of lawyers.

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Making rights reality for Sexual Assault victims with a disability

Making Rights Reality is a program at the South Eastern Centre Against Sexual Assault (SECASA) that gives extra help to adults who have been sexually assaulted and who have an intellectual disability or Acquired Brain Injury, or use aids to communicate.

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Making Rights Reality resources

For Family & Friends, Female Survivors, Male Survivors, Teachers, Workers

Making Rights Reality is a program at the South Eastern Centre Against Sexual Assault (SECASA) that gives extra help to adults who have been sexually assaulted and who have an intellectual disability or Acquired Brain Injury, or use aids to communicate.

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